5 Comments

  1. David, thanks for the writeup. We’d love to see some interesting Thunderbird shirts in the Community Store!

    Sam, to close the loop on your comment, we’ve updated the store so now there’s the option of having a blank back (i.e., no logo or URL). Our goal is to have an appropriate back design for each product, but that takes more time to implement, so we felt like this was a good short term solution.

    Bottom line is that we want people to develop shirts for any of the Mozilla products if they’re inspired to do so, and I think the store is in much better shape for that now. More details at https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=467957 if anyone is really curious.

    Thanks!

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  2. Just a question about thunderbird, hope it’s ok to ask here. I miss a place to read a little more about what’s happening in the thunderbird world. I’m aware of the rumbling edge, but in it’s current form it’s a little too technical for me. I think the people behind the lightning/sunbird blog have solved this nicely by providing the little extra info needed to understand what’s going on and what to expect in the future.
    Especially now before the TB 3.0 release it would be great with som more info (what’s happened since 2.0, some insights into the new features, why so long time, more about 3.0, what to expect after 3.0 etc. – would be great!)
    regards

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  3. Hi evero,
    The short answer is that I’m not personally aware of any blogs or sites that provides Thunderbird content for the average Joe or Jane like you and I with the exception of (and appropriately enough) MozillaMessaging.com and rebron.org. If there are others, I hope that they will be added here but you have certainly inspired me to address this issue and so I’ll be working on posting Thunderbird content that appeals to people of all technical backgrounds.

    When I started using Thunderbird I had never used a stand alone email client and really wasn’t too sure of what one actual was. I was aware of Outlook Express because it was bundled in with Windows but I never bothered to check it out. I decided to try Thunderbird based mainly on the fact that I was really impressed with Firefox and figured that other Mozilla products must be as equally great and I was right.
    It has taken nearly 4 years to obtain the knowledge that I now have about Thunderbird and now as a Thunderbird advocate, I see a great need to find ways to introduce Thunderbird to people who are not so technically inclined just like I was four years ago.

    With all of that being said, I’d love to have you join as at SpreadThunderbird.com to share your ideas on how we can present and promote Thunderbird to regular software end users and do it in ways that prevents them from feeling intimidated by using a new stand alone application.

    People obviously have the ability to learn new software, they do it everyday, but with the incredible ease of setting up and using webmail (our primary competition imo) we need to find ways to get the word out about Thunderbird and the many advantages of using it (instead of or in addition to webmail) and that setting up and using it is also very simple and it will take regular end users like you and I to do that.

    Hope to see you soon.
    Here are some links for you that I think that you’ll appreciate it.

    http://www.SpreadThunderbird.com
    (New) Official community powered Thunderbird marketing site.

    http://www.mozillamessaging.com/en-US/thunderbird/early_releases/
    Thunderbird 3 early releases. This will help to bring you up to date on the new features in Thunderbird 3.

    http://www.mozillamessaging.com/en-US/thunderbird/3.0b1/
    Thunderbird 3 Beta 1 Preview Release is the latest.

    http://www.mozillamessaging.com/en-US/thunderbird/3.0b1/releasenotes/
    The release notes for Thunderbird 3 Beta 1 shows you where we’re at in plain English.

    http://www.rebron.org/category/mozilla-messaging/
    Great site to stay informed about Thunderbird related news.

    http://www.spreadthunderbird.com/node/105
    Please feel free to add a testimonial of why you use Thunderbird.

    Like

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